Tag Archives: Point of View

Bink & Gollie Two for One by Kate DiCamillo


Bink and Gollie, two friends, go to the state fair. At the fair they play a throwing game and enter a talent show. There’s a lot of humor as Bink throws wild balls and hits the game man three times. After each time he mixes up his words and acts stunned from being hit in the head with the ball. This is a great beginning reader for first, second, and third graders.

Schema: state fair games

Text-to-Self Connections: throwing games on the midway, visiting the fair, being in a talent show, stage fright

Point of View: Describe what happens at the Whack a Duck game from the game man’s point of view. What does Gollie mean when she says, “This fear this can only end in tragedy.”

Inferring: What clues do Madame Prunely notice on the girl’s clothes that give her an inference about what they have done at the fair? She sees the ribbon that says “participant” in the talent show and infers that Gollie was not a winner. She sees Bink’s button that says she lost at the whack a duck game.

Writing: What are some things you have seen at a fair? Did you win a prize? What about the school carnival? How is the school carnival like a fair?

Charlie Joe Jackson’s Guide to Making Money and Charlie Joe Jackson’s Guide to Not Reading by Tommy Greenwald

In Charlie Joe’s new adventure about how to make money, Charlie and his friends will keep you laughing again. If you take Charlie Joe’s advise about choosing books with short chapters, this one will qualify. Lots of short chapters, funny sketches, and embarrassing situations will keep middle level readers turning the pages. This book would also be a great read aloud throughout the year. The chapters are short and funny and will keep your listeners wanting more.

Charlie wants to find ways to make money without having to put himself out too much. Between having to pay some of his profits to mother to clean up the mess his job created to impressing his dad with his computer skills, Charlie makes a little money, but more than that, he learns more about himself and his friends and has a strange feeling about, could it be, a future girlfriend!

Charlie Joe Jackson’s Guide to Not Reading
Schema: procrastination

Summary: Charlie Joe received books as his birthday present when he was only young child and was so disappointed that he developed a very strong distaste for reading. He schemes, plans, connives, bribes, and experiments in every way he can think of to get out of reading. He worries, gets punished by losing his phone, computer, and everything he enjoys for his lack of reading. Charlie Joe is in  middle school.   Between the reading problems, Charlie Joe is shocked by the relationships and cliques that are developing in his school.   His parents are embarrassed by him, and his teachers are disappointed in him, but Charlie Joe likes himself and is optimistic. His final stand at getting out of reading involves him launching a social experiment to get kids from opposite cliques to like and hang out with each other.

Cause and Effect: Because Charlie Joe will not read his own books, the effect is that he suffers many consequences.

Voice: Charlie’s voice permeates the book.

The book is formatted with many short chapters and short lists.

Text-to-Text connection with The Diary of the Wimpy Kid series in storyline as well as art work.

Author’s POV: The book is written in  first person.

Check out the author’s website.

The Secrets of Eastcliff-by-the-Sea: The Story of Annaliese Easterling & Throckmorton, Her Simply Remarkable Sock Monkey by Eileen Beha

Throckmorton S. Monkey, a great listener and narrator, tells the story about nine-year-old, Annaliese Easterling, whose mother ran away when she was only a baby. Her father is busy, and they are very wealthy, so she is cared for by a nanny. There is a secret about why Annaliese Easterling’s mother left, and Annaliese is determined to find out what it is. As the story begins, the sock monkey’s of the children and grandchildren of Grandmother Easterling receive a formal invitation inviting them and their owner to her 90th birthday party. Grandmother had made and named each of them a sock monkey when they were born. Talk begins throughout the family that if they do not have their sock monkey they might get excluded from Grandmother’s will. Annaliese and her eleven-year-old twin brothers,  take to the attic to find their castaway sock monkeys and discover a suitcase filled with clothes that once belonged to their mother. Annaliese takes the clothes and begins wearing them in her room as she thinks about her mother.

The monkeys observe the humans and although they can not talk, they are always great listeners who love them.  This story is like The Velveteen Rabbit, The Westingame, and Mary Poppins all rolled into one with a mystery and a surprise ending. I highly recommend it to readers of all ages who love a wholesome mystery with a happy ending.

Scaredy-Cat, Splat by Rob Scotton and Pumpkin Trouble by Jan Thomas

Schema: Pumpkins, Halloween

Text-to-Self connections: pumpkin is in our schema

Point of View: In Pumpkin Trouble, Duck, Mouse, and Pig view the Pumpkin Monster from their own points of view never realizing that they are talking about the same “monster” who is duck with a pumpkin stuck on his head.

Text-to-Text Connections: both books feature pumpkins and animals who get their head stuck inside their Jack-o-lanterns.

Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick

Schema: mysteries, museums

Text-to-text connections: From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg

Cause and Effect: Because Ben was talking on the phone during a storm, the effect was that Ben lost his hearing when lightning struck the phone line.

Characterization: List Ben’s traits: curious, smart, brave to travel alone, good speller and writer, uses any resource available, resourceful for eating food left by others. How are the character traits of Ben and his mother alike?

Drawing Conclusions: Practice drawing conclusions as you read the pictures for Rose’s story. Inference is used to draw the conclusions.

Point of View: author’s: third person, character’s: Ben and Rose

Summarizing: Summarize Rose’s early life up to when she meets Ben

Mental Image: Can you make a mental image of the wolves chasing Ben? Check out the wolves’ diorama from the AMNH in New York City.

Go to the American Museum of Natural History in NYC’s website and look at some of the exhibits online.

Check out the panorama of NYC boroughs at the Queens Museum of History.

 

 

The Day Roy Riegels Ran the Wrong Way by Dan Gutman

Schema: football scoring rules

Text-to-Text Connection: Turkey Bowl by Phil Bildner also takes place many years ago.

In this full color picture book, the author shares the story of Roy Riegels as historical fiction. The real life lesson is that we all make mistakes, but we shouldn’t let a mistake  destroy our ability to move forward and achieve in the future. The story tells how Roy continued to be great athlete and a successful businessman and did not let his big mistake and label of “wrong-way Riegels” color his future in a negative way.

Author’s purpose and Point of View: Written in third person, the author tells the real life story of Roy Riegels.

Cause and Effect: Because Roy ran the wrong way, the effect was that his team lost their big game.

Drawing Conclusions: We can draw the conclusion that Roy did not let his mistake ruin his life because he continued to be successful.

 

Never Forgotten by Patricia C. McKissack; artwork by Leo & Diane Dillon

Schema: slavery

The author tells the story in third person in a poetic format.

Setting: West Africa, 1725

Author’s Purpose: to show the perspective of a family whose child has been taken by slave traders

Voice: The language the author uses creates a unique voice for Dinga

Personification: The four elements: Earth, Fire, Water, and Air are personified as they seek to mother and then find Musafa.

Summary: Tell the story in sequence from Musafa’s birth to his being found again in the Southern United States in Charleston, South Carolina.

Drawing Conclusions: Do you conclude that Dinga went mad or insane with the disappearance of Musafa or do you think the elements could have communicated Musafa’s whereabouts to him?

Hurricanes: Many hurricanes have hit the South Carolina coast. The author notes at the end of the book that there is a legend in Barbados that says the “hurricane is Mother Africa in search of her lost children.”

Scapegoat: The Story of a Goat Named Oat and a Chewed-up Coat by Dean hale


Schema: blaming something on someone else

Definition of Scapegoat

In rhyming text the author shares the story about very mischevious Jimmy and his goat, P. Petunia Oat.

Sequencing: What did Jimmy blame on Petunia in order: eating his coat, throwing away the TV remote, blowing his nose in the tote, breaking the boat, shaving the goat’s thoat

Reader’s Theater: This book would be a great reader’s theater with a part for the goat and a part for Jimmy.

Author reads his book in Spanish on You Tube.

Characterize Jimmy and Petunia based on the text and illustrations.

Drawing Conclusions: What conclusion do you come to about what happened to Jimmy’s coat?

Point of View: The author’s POV is third person.

 

 

 

Bailey by Harry Bliss

Schema: first days of school, steps to getting dressed and ready for school

Text-to-text connections: being prepared with homework, participating in music, p. e., share time

Cause and effect: Because Bailey eats paper, the effect is his stomach hurts

Point of View: the story is told from Bailey’s point of view in 3rd person

This book is a great choice to teach text-to-self connections with the youngest reader.  Students will relate to the activities that Bailey goes through during his school day.

 

Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story From the Underground Railroad by Ellen Levine

Schema: Underground railroad, escaped slaves

Author’s purpose: to share African American history

Author’s Point of View: 3rd person omniscient as we see the story from more than one character’s point of view

Cause and Effect: Because Henry’s family was sold, the effect was that Henry went to the extreme of mailing himself to escape the sorrow of slavery.

Characterize Henry: hard working, good listener, loving, strong

Mental Images: Henry imagined the carts carrying away his family and all that he loved every night.

Drawing Conclusions: Henry knew that the mail was delivered everywhere. He thought he could stand being in a box for many hours. He drew the conclusion that he could mail himself north to escape slavery.

After Henry’s family is sold, he purposefully pours sulphuric acid on his hand so that he could stay home from work in order to get some help in mailing himself to the northern states to escape slavery in the southern United States.