Tag Archives: Personification

Sequoia by Tony Johnston

Schema: trees, nature
Text-to-Self Connection: seeing tall trees, show images of the giant trees, talk about the senses and read how the tree hears and feels things. Also, the book represents the seasons as the tree lives through each year.

Extended Metaphor: The story is told from the tree’s point of view as if the tree is a very old soul.

Personification: The tree takes on human traits as “he smells fire” and “feels a chill.”

What a lovely book to read to children! The beauty of the west coast wildlife is illustrated throughout the book. The feelings of the ancient tree show readers the value of taking care of these beauties. Maybe this book will inspire readers to visit the Sequoia in their lifetime. I visited this area for the first time just a few years ago and even though I had seen the trees on video and in books, it was awesome to experience their magnificence in person.

Six Crows by Leo Lionni

Schema: fables

Text-to-Self Connections: fussing and fighting with each other, getting back at one another

Cause and Effect: Because the crows ate the wheat seeds, the effect is the farmer builds a scarecrow to make them go away.

Because the crows build a very scary kite, the effect is that the farmer builds an even scarier scarecrow.

Point of View: From the crows’ point of view, they decide they must scare the scarecrow away so they can eat the grain.

Drawing Conclusions: The owl observes that the wheat is going to spoil if the crows and farmer continue fighting so he becomes a negotiator and talks to both sides who come to a compromise.

Synthesis: I am synthesizing that talking things out is better than letting what we are fighting over spoil.

Moral: “Words can do magic.” from the owl in Lionni’s story

Personification: the animals take on human characteristics and feeling

 

The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man by Michael Chabon


Schema: Super-heroes

Text-to-Text Connections: Superman

Personification: The eyeball is given human qualities; the jello can slurp
Metaphor: comparing his cape to a red rocket, his mask to a dark night at midnight

Context Clues: Vocabulary in the story: photon: a type of radiation: the character sends heat rays from his eyes
Thermovulcanized: a process that freezes then melts a rubberized object to make it tougher
Orb: ball

Drawing conclusions: we inferred that when he changed to his normal self that he is the man that looks like Superman, but at the end we realized we were stereotyping the hero because he turns out to be the little boy in the illustration. At the end notice his shadow looks like the Superman character though…is the shadow his imagination? Was the man his dad?

Author’s Purpose: To persuade, inform, or entertain?

Subway Story by Julia Sarcone-Roach

 

Schema: subways, barrier reefs

Text-to-Self Connections: being afraid

Personification: The subway is personified and shares her feelings of fear about being discarded, but when she realizes she has a new purpose with all the fishes she is happy.

Compare and Contrast: The ocean floor is dark like the subway tunnels, but different because the subway tunnel is not under water.
What an interesting story told from the point of view of an historical subway car and man made barrier reefs. After being repaired as much as possible, the subway is deconstructed and transported to the ocean floor. The author includes a note about other man made reefs and how they help the ocean and people who fish nearby. The author includes a note about man made barrier reefs.

Henry’s Heart: A Boy, His Heart, and a New Best Friend by Charise Mericle Harper

Schema: human heart functions, love

Informational Literature: much factual information about the function of the heart is included. Information about foods, exercise, and the function of the parts of the heart are included in the story.

Personification: Henry’s heart is depicted with some human features with eyes a mouth and feelings.

Henry falls in love with a puppy. We finally have an author who thinks about the chaos that is caused by a nude body part and includes a fig leaf to cover that part in the illustration of Henry’s body. This would be a fun book to read around Valentine’s Day.

Cause and Effect: Henry’s heart is effected by the different causes that occur in the story. His heart reacts to the different stimuli with a fast or slow beat.

Drawing Conclusions and Inferring: What do you conclude Henry has fallen in love with when you read the description of the “girl?”

 

Never Forgotten by Patricia C. McKissack; artwork by Leo & Diane Dillon

Schema: slavery

The author tells the story in third person in a poetic format.

Setting: West Africa, 1725

Author’s Purpose: to show the perspective of a family whose child has been taken by slave traders

Voice: The language the author uses creates a unique voice for Dinga

Personification: The four elements: Earth, Fire, Water, and Air are personified as they seek to mother and then find Musafa.

Summary: Tell the story in sequence from Musafa’s birth to his being found again in the Southern United States in Charleston, South Carolina.

Drawing Conclusions: Do you conclude that Dinga went mad or insane with the disappearance of Musafa or do you think the elements could have communicated Musafa’s whereabouts to him?

Hurricanes: Many hurricanes have hit the South Carolina coast. The author notes at the end of the book that there is a legend in Barbados that says the “hurricane is Mother Africa in search of her lost children.”

A Call for a New Alphabet by Jef Czekaj

Schema: alphabet, vowels, spelling

Text-to-Text Connection: Alphabet Mystery by Audrey Wood

Cause and Effect: Because X changed his mind, the effect is the alphabet stayed the same.

Drawing Conclusions: The letters draw the conclusion that each letter has an important part to play when they begin exploring the roles of each other.

X is the narrator of the story written from a third person POV.  Students will relate to the story about X and how he wasn’t happy wear he stood in the alphabet. The author explores the role of each letter and the important parts they each play. The confusion of spelling with the “i before e except after c” rule as well as plural words that change f to v as in calf and calves make the other letter realize that all of them have a certain and necessary role to play.  The illustrations are very colorful and the book is in a graphic novel format with large text.

There is a short animation of the book on You Tube.

Scapegoat: The Story of a Goat Named Oat and a Chewed-up Coat by Dean hale


Schema: blaming something on someone else

Definition of Scapegoat

In rhyming text the author shares the story about very mischevious Jimmy and his goat, P. Petunia Oat.

Sequencing: What did Jimmy blame on Petunia in order: eating his coat, throwing away the TV remote, blowing his nose in the tote, breaking the boat, shaving the goat’s thoat

Reader’s Theater: This book would be a great reader’s theater with a part for the goat and a part for Jimmy.

Author reads his book in Spanish on You Tube.

Characterize Jimmy and Petunia based on the text and illustrations.

Drawing Conclusions: What conclusion do you come to about what happened to Jimmy’s coat?

Point of View: The author’s POV is third person.

 

 

 

A Pet for Miss Wright by Judy Young; illustrated by Andrea Wesson

Schema: pets, choosing a pet

Text-to-Self Connections: Choosing a pet, getting a pet that causes problems

Text-to-Text Connections: What Pet to Get by Emma Dodd

Author’s purpose: The main reason the author wrote the book could be to show students the process of  choosing the right pet, and also, how an author has to follow certain steps and procedures to get a book published.

Sequencing: Students could sequence the steps Miss Wright takes in choosing her pet.

Cause and Effect: Because the bird imitates the sound of the keys, the effect is Miss Wright returns him, etc.

Compare and Contrast the different pets.

The Three Little Aliens and the Big Bad Robot by Margaret McNamara & Mark Fearing

Schema: The original story of the three little pigs

Compare and Contrast: the original story with the modern one

Personification: the robot

Characterize the robot and the wolf in the original story

The story of the Three Little Pigs meets the space age in this new twist on the original story. The three aliens all find homes in space, one on a rover, one on a satellite, and the third one on Mars where he builds a sturdy house. The planets are illustrated in order from the sun so a reader could gain some reinforcement of space learning as the book is read. This would be a support for a compare and contrast unit. The illustrations are colorful and add humor to the story.