Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake by Michael B. Kaplan


Schema: waiting, obeying,  favorite foods, making healthy choices,  tantrums

Text-to-text connection: Where the Wild Things Are by Sendak

Point of View: The story is told from Betty’s POV.

Thoughtful  language and detailed illustrations come together to create a book about patience and manners that does  not talk down to children. The feeling and lesson this story conveys will connect with young readers and listeners. The concept of patience is difficult to explain to young children, and the author and illustrator have done an excellent job. It’s wonderful to come across a children’s book that is as strong as this one.   Betty Bunny is determined to get her way, but she listens, tries, and learns, and  grows.   The mother in the story is a great role model and example of patience as she uses appropriate language and examples to explain patience to Betty.

Cause and Effect: Because of Betty’s behavior, the effect is that she is sent to her room without her cake.

Predicting: What do you predict will happen to the cake in Betty’s sock?

Synthesis: Ask students to share some examples of when they have had to be patient.  What is patience like?  What can we do to show that we are being patient?

 

 

email

3 thoughts on “Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake by Michael B. Kaplan

  1. Pingback: Carnival of Children’s Literature – September 28, 2011 | Texas Librarian

  2. Jackie

    I love how you set up your post as mini lessons. I’ve been trying to do the same thing at my site. Reviewing books is helpful for parents when choosing books, but these lessons help them come alive! That’s what I aim for, finding ways to make books important to kids.
    Thanks the ideas.

  3. Texas Librarian Post author

    Jackie »
    Thank you! Thinking about what I think when I am reading and modeling it for my students has made reading an action event during story time, No longer do the kids just sit and listen. They contribute their text-to-self connections as we go. Debbie Miller’s book, Reading With Meaning, is a great resource.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *